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20130313
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
these days and so conditioned that the only thing that matters is tax policy even if taxes were so much higher in that roaring bull market that we're scared of their own shadows and they were hated or shunned by people who talk about it. case in point, retail sales. this morning it came out and they were terrific. you should not be shocked if you watch this show that we had the best retail numbers in five months, hardly a month goes by, and stores are telling me over and over again that the things are very strong and the thesis-mongering bears talk about gasoline is expensive and the expiration of the payroll tax holiday is devastating. the sequester is devastating, too. it is true that going over the fiscal cliff could have been horrendous and it destroyed confidence, but it certainly cured that. ever since then, the economy is better than anyone seems to want to talk about. we hear talk that it isn't. those bears endlessly drummed these negatives into our heads and they're thumb-sucking theorists. they're not schooled in the real world of companies as . they don't look bottoms up and
as bond market substitutes, and dividend paying stocks yield more than treasuries, and the tax treatment remains superior and far more bountiful than bond market, interest payments, cow upons taxed at a much higher income rate and created a very helpful investment climate. no matter what critics say, unless unemployment makes a quantum leap to 6.5%, yes, ben bernanke is the father of the bull market. that is for certain. and the fed has been incredibly important impetus behind the giant move. now, there are tons of pessimists out there who believe that because the fed created this environment, the fed is doomed to destroy it. the moment they take away the punch bowl and start tightening, they believe -- i think that's wrong. and more important, i think you are getting ahead of yourself if that's what are you worried about. and people have been worried for a year now. just because bernanke made the bull market, doesn't mean it's a pitiful helpful orphan, the bull can stand on its own four legs, and even if it wants on its own now, i expect bernanke won't tighten until we are at a place we
about cyprus and the atm bank lines and the tax scheme where they essentially bang the depositors for money. they violated the sacrosanct compact, i told him, that was meant to protect those deposits. stewart's all about common sense. he didn't think all of that much about the cyprus story. more importantly, he was hoping we wouldn't make too of it on this show because it would blow over since cyprus was a special case that couldn't easily be extrapolated and maybe even rally a little. then i went home after having some breakfast and i set out to study the charts and more on this later and settled in for serious ncaa bracketology while watching the canes play the tar heels. i tried to stay focused on march madness but i began to get bombarded by emails from bears worldwide -- [ shots fired ] brown bears, kodiaks, even koalas, telling me, this is it, jim, this is the big kahuna that i was being way too glib about the confiscation scheme that would rock my world. i knew not to dismiss the darn cyprus situation. i actually bothered to argue back, silly me. first i offered the standar
raised income taxes on the wealthy. >> boo! >> took the marginal rate to the 75% and instituted a 2% payroll tax for social security. their goal? they wanted to start trying to balance the budget because the treasury secretary were worried about the long term deficit? does that sound familiar? the fed tightened rates. doing what all the bears say bernanke should do, betting that inflation could rage and rage easily. if the fed stayed even by which is what his critics are saying he should do right now. but when we went down this road in 1937 it sent the economy into an amazing tail spin. causing a recession within a depression. it was an economic calamity that was totally avoidable and the people in power made different, smarter choices. especially the federal reserve. ben bernanke does not want history to repeat itself. he's not going down the path of what the fed did in 1937. he's not stupid. even though that's exactly the path unfortunately that the president and congress are taking. bernanke recognizes that obama and congress have repeated the errors of 1937 down to a tee. he can
company with a big 3.9% yield? a heck of a lot better than treasuries after the tax benefits. it's been left behind by the rest of its cohort. i can't believe i'm talking about this one because it's so far behind. i'm talking about one of the great american companies, merck, mrk, the pharmaceuticals giant that's stumbled more times in the last few months than a college kid on st. paddy's day. since early december, the early pharma names have roared. pfizer up 12%, bristol miers up. i'm typical of my eighth anniversary, i somehow got blue ink on my hand. and cell gene jumped 43%. meanwhile, merck has done nothing. it's actually down about 1% over the same period. right now there are reasons merck has underperformed the rest of the ones. in december, the good -- in december, the company got bad clinical trials from a new cholesterol drug that they were working on. and i thought it was going to be a big one, i have to tell you. so merck decided to stop development here in the u.s. and pull the drug overseas where it was already approved. this was one that i thought was just going to be the
in to stem the decline with the absolute dumbest plan i had seen, to tax the depositors, the small-time depositors of a country with hot money, perhaps hot laundered money from russia. that's right. the europeans with the help of the imf reminding you just how stupid of the concept of the euro is, how intendable it is to keep your money in a european bank. the moronic plan gave a super reason to go right back into gold. now before i tell you how i think you're going to get still more fantastic chance to buy the precious metal, let me say i don't want to fall prey to the notion what should happen will happen. i think if i had money in the european bank, i would say to heck with it, i'm going put it in an american bank. who needs this worry. i would typically feel that way if i were wealthy and had the ability to wire the money with a key stroke to let's say jpmorgan where i got my money now. even with the revelations, revelations i should add, brought to light by jpmorgan itself. it's so easy to move your money, i can't believe any wealthy person stays in the european banks. you can
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)